Book Analytics

A good novel can be read on many levels. There is always a superficial layer, the story itself. A compelling story can be followed and enjoyed by the widest targeted audience. Beneath the surface, there are often layers of complexity and literary devices at play. Metaphor, themes and satire can be cloaked or revealed transparently. We all learn about this in grade school, and some go further in university really dissecting books for everything the author intended (or maybe didn’t) to present the reader. Here is a slightly, more data-driven way to dig into a book. I loaded the entire content of both On Swift Wings and Gulliver’s Travels into a data analytics workflow to compare and contrast the styles and contents. A few tools used here include sentiment flow, word correlation, word complexity and vocabulary. There are some fascinating details that can be revealed. I hope you’ll enjoy this data analysis of these two novels.

By the way, the script I wrote takes about 5 seconds to run once I have the manuscript, whether from Project Gutenberg or a text/word file. If you’d like to see the same analysis about your book, or a favourite public domain book, just let me know.

Comparing Sentiment Flow

Sentiment Flow Analysis in On Swift Wings
Sentiment Flow Analysis in Gulliver’s Travels

I think these two graphs are particularly interesting. The top two bar charts are an analysis of sentiment value in On Swift Wings (my book) and the bottom two are for Gulliver’s Travels. You’ll note that I’ve blocked out the end of On Swift Wings. I don’t wish to spoil any surprises about whether the ending is happy or sad.

For background, the BING model determines a raw count of whether a word should be deemed “Positive” or “Negative.” Simply put, if the bar is above the line, then the corresponding 1% of the book has more positive words than negative ones. The AFINN model scores different words according to whether they are very positive, somewhat positive, somewhat negative, or very negative and assigns a value that way. In this way, the AFINN model measures the use of emotions with strength. Words like “Torture” and “Ecstasy” bear a greater weight than “Good” or “Bad.”

The first interesting finding is that in general I use quite a few more negative words than Jonathan Swift. The overall balance in terms of raw scores flows from positive at the beginning of the novel to more negative in the later stages. Swift tends to be more positive throughout, in fact, using more positive words particularly near the end of Gulliver’s Travels. (Note, I’m still not talking about the actual end of On Swift Wings.)

While I tend to use more negative words than positive, by weight (AFINN) On Swift Wings has a similar weighted score to Gulliver’s Travels. Most parts of the book are positive, and to a similar degree to Gulliver’s Travels. I think this is particularly interesting. Evidently, I use stronger, more impactful words to counterbalance a general negativity.

Sentiment Word Maps

On Swift Wings Sentiment Cloud
Gulliver’s Travels Sentiment Cloud

To the point about the strength of words used, these word clouds illustrate for each book how commonly different words are used that carry sentiment (size of font) and how impactful that sentiment is (lighter colour = less impact). Both books show many similar words (Great, Like, Good, No, Dead), but there are differences. There are a greater quantity and distribution sentimental words used more frequently in On Swift Wings. Both images were generated using the same code, the difference in shape is due to a difference in style. I invite you to look at the words and compare them yourself. I could look at these two figures for hours.

Again, if you’d like to see your favourite public domain novel, let me know, I’ll run the script and send the results. (I’ll probably put the code on GitHub soon too)

Word Correlation Map

On Swift Wings Correlations
Gulliver’s Correlations

These two figures demonstrate word combinations. Words that are used frequently together are connected. The more often, the thicker and brighter the line. Again, many differences can be seen between the two works. I tend to use a few words together frequently while Mr. Swift has a few clusters of interconnected words, and few other patterns he repeats.

Word Summary Statistics

Measure On Swift Wings Gulliver’s Travels Comparison
Word Count121,426104,280116%
Unique Words11,8488,359142%
Unique Word Ratio9.758.02122%
Average Word Length6.396.21103%

Here’s a really quick little analysis counting the number of words, how many of them are unique, what the ratio of unique to total words is and average word length. It isn’t a valid measure of quality, but On Swift Wings is 16% longer than Gulliver’s Travels, there are 42% more unique words in On Swift Wings, and each word is on average 4% longer. Reading On Swift Wings, you’ll encounter a new word approximately 22% more frequently than reading Gulliver’s Travels.

Before the hate rains down, please remember that this is all good fun. Gulliver’s Travels is a great book, and I strongly recommend it. I only hope that On Swift Wings will be intriguing and entertaining as well.

Weekly Review Section

Thank You Stewart Adams

I received my first review on Amazon this week! As hoped, the book is a challenging but rewarding read. Please keep the reviews coming! Amazon.ca or Amazon.com, Goodreads, Indigo. Reviews are desperately needed to spread the word and get the book in front of more readers. Please.

An interesting modernization of Gulliver’s Travels. There are some great concepts in the book including “perfect” societies and how one person can make a difference.
It is not an easy read due to the meaty sentences, but I am glad I read it.

Worth your time. Stewart Adams – Amazon Review

Cash and a Cold Start

It has been an interesting couple of weeks. My book has now been out for just under three months. This means that I’m starting to get my first royalty payments. In a typically convenient moment, during a span of two hours today, I ran into two things related to the top of my mind issue I’m dealing with right now. (Reviews – Please Review On Swift Wings)

  • The first relates to a favourite cartoonist of mine, Brian Gordon, who is releasing his third book shortly. If you’re a parent, I guarantee that you’ll find his work funny. I’d definitely recommend his books. He posted about the importance of pre-orders for a struggling author. Getting pre-orders helps deal with my second related event.
  • The second came while I was working on a data science course as part of my other job, the one that keeps me from struggling. It was talking about recommender systems like those used on Netflix and Amazon, and the “Cold Start” problem, where until an item has a certain number of reviews, and a sufficient number of people have commented, recommender systems are generally incapable of recommending an item.
Cold Start
Thawing out the cold start

Anyway, I’m trying to figure out an incentive to get reviews online that doesn’t fall foul of the rules and regulations put forward by Amazon and co. I’m not allowed to buy reviews or have family review it, and I don’t intend to risk it.

The other cool thing as mentioned previously is that I got my first royalty payments this week. This is for the few pre-orders that I did receive. Since I didn’t really try to drive pre-orders on my first book, I didn’t expect or get many, but it is pretty cool to get a little money. Now I get to watch the money trickle in.

A little update on the Immortals – book #2. I’m now working again on the plan for the book. I had put it down for a couple weeks to focus on other things, but I’m back at it. I currently have about twenty pages of notes. I think I might show how data science-y I am in a subsequent post, demonstrating my tabular approach to planning, making sure that I am handling all of the themes, characters, and plotlines appropriately throughout the novel. I’ll also show some of the natural language analysis I did of the first book when it was getting close to completion, as compared to Gulliver’s Travels, particularly around sentiment analysis.

Coming Soon: Data Science and Novel Writing

Reviews and Marketing

Please review On Swift Wings

My son (the joker) and daughter at the Coles-North Hill near my house at the store where I bought my first books. (On Swift Wings is now on shelves at Coles and Chapters in Calgary)

If there is one thing that I’m learning, it is just how difficult it is to market a book. While there are over a hundred copies of my book that people have bought and are reading, and I know that a few of them have read it from cover to cover, I still have no formal reviews. This is stalling my marketing efforts. As a first-time author, nobody is going to drop $20 on a book that nobody has said is a good read. Most of the people that have read the book are related to me, and are therefore precluded from providing reviews. My brother jokes, “even a bad one?”

Ultimately, I have to get some reviews (and hopefully positive ones.) I’ve foolishly tried to market On Swift Wings without them, and I’ve come to the conclusion that without reviews, marketing is a bit like yelling at a wall. I’ve heard that people are finding the book challenging but rewarding. The satire is amusing. I appreciate that feedback enormously. (Please make your thoughts public. Also it’d be great if your thoughts were positive :))

Please review my book!

Paid Marketing Efforts

I’ve tried a bunch of things, and as I learn more and more, I keep adding to this. I’m sure I’ve made a ton of mistakes, but that is part of the fun of this little venture.

Facebook

I’ve paid for Facebook marketing efforts. I put an advertisement for the book targeted at fans of Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, and included a note that 20% of all author royalties will be donated to the Children’s hospital. Currently, I think that amounts to about $80, as well as my own share attempt at launch, where each share of my post I donated a dollar to the Children’s Hospital (76 shares). I’m happy to donate, but this didn’t really drum up sales (see review problem above.)

About 6600 people saw my first Facebook post ($150). 582 people liked the post. I’m not aware of anybody that actually bought the book that way. The second post was more focused, only 1100 people saw that one ($100), and 165 people liked the post. I’m a data scientist, so the insights about who actually likes the post is quite fun. Facebook shows some basic demographics about location, age, gender.

  • 80% of the people who see my ads are women
  • 35% of the total are women over the age of 65
  • 83% see the add on their mobile app, 10% on a desktop, and the remaining 7% are viewing Facebook through a browser on their phone.
  • 20% of viewers are in England, 14% in Ontario

It costs between $0.25 and 0.50 per engagement (click, comment, or share.) So for $250, I have a bunch of post-likes, but definitely not $250 worth of sales.

Amazon

I’ve tried a couple giveaways on Amazon. The nice thing here is that I can test to see whether people are buying the book or not (without reviews, they aren’t.) Giveaways work by the seller buying x copies of the book and providing it to every y-th entrant. For paperbacks, the smallest number is 700, so every 700th person to enter wins a copy of the book during the 9-day giveaway window.

The first giveaway cost me three copies of the book @ $15 each. 2100 people were reached by the ad, but as far as I know nobody bought a copy. At least three people have the book now, maybe they will review it.

The second giveaway cost me nothing. I added a condition that to enter the person has to follow me as an author. I got 698 entries (2 short of the first copy.) At least 90 people actually looked at the book, which suggests to me that they considered buying it. Fortunately it cost me nothing, unfortunately, nobody got a copy of the book. Also, nobody bought a copy after looking at it either.

Kindle

I also have a long-running ad on Kindle when the user locks the screen. It has been posted 5,777 times, has cost $1.94, has generated 11 clicks (and zero sales.)

Donations

I’ve donated several copies to public libraries, and tried to give copies to my old schools (but haven’t heard back from either of them yet.) I’ve long said that it isn’t about the money, which is good, ’cause I ain’t makin’ any. I hope people read On Swift Wings, are entertained, and that it makes them think.

Back to Reviews

At this point, I need people to read my book and to post reviews to Amazon, or goodreads, or Indigo. I’m not allowed to offer incentives or free books, I can’t have my family do reviews, I can only ask nicely. Please read and review my book. (If you’re in Calgary, there are several library copies you can borrow for free, both hardcover and paperback.)

Library and Immortality

On Swift Wings at my childhood library… with my child

Photo credit: Des Wiens

I took my son to the library so he could see his old man’s book for the first time. I think I was just about as excited as he was to see the book at the same library (Louise Riley) that I visited as a child. It is pretty incredible to see it there, even if my last name (Wiens) relegates the book to the furthest wall from the entrance. It is out there and people can read it whenever they want. How cool is that? Oh, and my son was the second person in the city to check out my book.

Book #2 – Working Title – Immortals

I did an author interview with Indie Book Publishing a couple months ago. The interview itself hasn’t been published yet, but something did come out of the exercise. One of the questions was who are some of your favourite characters and why. I hope I’m not stealing the wind from Indie here, but after thinking about it for a while, my answer was Ryuudrikje. I had thought about writing a second novel, but I hadn’t thought much about what I would write. With Ryu, I had already created a world with secondary characters ready, and interactions pre-established. Furthermore, I already had created some conflict and and underlying plot.

While I was on vacation these past few weeks, I thought about what I would like to say. (I’ve already said that I write with purpose, and the purpose drives the story.) I knew how I wanted the story to end, I knew some of the major events, so while we were visiting Venice and Rome, I was taking inspiration and backwards planning the second novel from my desired conclusion in my head. When we got to Imperia, and while my family was swimming in the pool, I took the backwards-planned plot from my head and wrote down the major events.

I expect the second novel to be quite different from the first. Instead of the essayist, travelogue, first-person format that was copied from Mr. Swift, I am intending to write the second novel in more of a modern fantasy format, written in the third person, with several interweaving plotlines. Readers of the first book might catch a few extra tidbits, but it will stand on its own without duplicating the content of On Swift Wings. There will be crossover, but written from an entirely different perspective, that will, I anticipate, be entertaining both to the reader and to myself in writing the story.

I would love to hear any thoughts people have about this idea. I’m not setting any deadlines for myself at this time, I have a lot of work still refining details and ensuring that the plot is interesting enough and keeping the themes in mind before I even start writing. I would be quite pleased if I could have this book written by the end of 2020, but I won’t hold myself to that schedule yet.

International Book Tour and Book 2 Progress

At a little-known stadium somewhere in Rome. Mostly just rocks and sand as far as I can tell.

Apologies for the missed post this past week. I’ve been on an international book tour to Italy and France. Of course, when I say an international book tour, I entirely mean that I spent a couple weeks sauntering about Venice, Rome, and Imperia in Italy, and Nice in France, and a bit of time on the beach in Comox, BC. I thoroughly enjoyed inhaling and absorbing the history and locales about which I’ve read and studied so much. All of the places to which we went were incredible and have proven to be a great inspiration to me. So cool to visit three places so geographically close but so extensively different and unique. Every time I travel, my world grows and I feel a much better person for it. I hope that the inspiration I’ve received will reflect in my upcoming works.

It wasn’t all fun and games, I did get down to work and have prepared the storyboard for my second novel. I have prepared character profiles, elaborated upon the setting, and prepared the major plot markers. Alright, I admit, this is fun and games, as my wife tends to point out. Every time I figure out something clever, or funny, or I advance a key plot, I am pleased as punch to go cryptically tell her what I’ve thought up.

I’ll talk a bit about the plan for the upcoming novel next week. I intend for it to be quite different from the first in many ways, but similar in others. I’m going to take my time to plan it all very carefully to ensure the highest quality work of which I’m capable.

Thank you for reading my blog, I hope you’re enjoying On Swift Wings. On that front, I received some news that Indigo is going to put a number of copies on their shelves at Chinook and Crowfoot, and I will likely do a book signing there in the coming weeks. (More on that to come.) A few informal reviews have begun to trickle in, but nothing yet on any review site like Amazon, Indigo, GoodReads, etc. Generally people are saying that it is challenging but rewarding, and the satire is well done. I am really looking forward to hearing and reading more feedback to help with the planning of the second novel.

BW

Little Library and Big Bookstore

Free Little Library in Comox, BC – The Bookaneers (On Swift Wings is on the top shelf in the middle)

A short little post on this Tuesday morning:

One fun (and challenging) part of the journey has been to get the book out so that people are aware of it. I really appreciate everybody who has shared the word of my book, and especially recommended it to others. I found this cute free little library in Comox, British Columbia with a couple copies of my book (thanks mom and dad.)

I got a little traction with Indigo books as well. You can now order my book online through their website:

Indigo Hardcover – $39.95

Indigo Paperback – $22.95

Kobo eReader Version – $9.89

They are also talking about ordering copies for a couple large format Calgary stores. (I will definitely be taking a picture if/when that happens.)

I love seeing people with a copy of my book. Please reply with a picture holding the book and where you are located. I have a couple craft-type ideas that I’d like to try and do if enough people respond with pictures.

I’m also talking with Indigo about doing a book signing in the fall at Crowfoot and/or Chinook Centre in Calgary. More details to follow. Thanks for following things. I’ll be working on my second novel in the next couple weeks. With a little luck, the planning stage will be nearly complete and I’ll be writing by September.

BW

Libraries, Archives, and ISBN

My local library – Louise Riley

This past week I’ve been busy adding On Swift Wings to libraries and archives. I discovered that the Calgary Public Library had accepted my request and picked up two copies of the book. Even cooler than that, both copies had been checked out and a hold was waiting on one of them!

I was already in touch with the Calgary Public Library to donate a few more copies to their collection. They requested an additional three copies which I sent off yesterday. I’m very excited to have more people read the book. (It isn’t about the money, it is about the story and ideas. I really hope people get something out of the book.

Library and Archives Canada

At the same time, I’ve been in touch with Library and Archives Canada about including my book available to the fourth largest library in the world tasked with keeping a record of Canadian history. They too have been extremely friendly and helpful, and I’ve donated a hardcover and paperback version to them as well.

I could really use a little help from my readers on this subject. I had the book added to my own public library, but for those of you outside of Calgary, would you be willing to check your own library to see if they have any copies, and assuming they don’t, could you put in a request to add the book to their collection? Libraries are able to order the book at a 55% discount to the retail rate from IngramSpark.

Proudly Canadian

One great thing about being Canadian (and there are many) is that registering for an ISBN ( International Standard Book Number) – think serial number for books, required to sell in bookstores or online, is free. As long as you’re a Canadian citizen, getting an ISBN is totally free. If you’re an American, you have to pay Bowker $125/ISBN for the same service.

A unique ISBN is required for each book format, Hardcover, Paperback, and eBook. That means that my book would have cost an extra $300US if I wasn’t Canadian. Sweet deal. Pretty happy to donate a couple copies of my book to LAC instead.